Managing Application Components: Using Scripts versus Application Performance Management (APM) Tools

If you work for an IT organization, you know it can be hard to keep strategic systems running to meet service level commitments. The rules used to manage the operations of these systems can be captured and enforced by hand coded scripts or Application Performance Management (APM) tools, such as NXTmonitor. You will find key differences in usability, maintainability, scalability and failover, and costs.

Before we get into the differences, it would be helpful to have a clear understanding of scripts and APMS. Scripts are executable lines of code that can be used to manage the start-up and shutdown rules for application components and business logic. You need to understand the scripting language to write, manage, and read scripts. APMs are applications that manage the complex start-up and shutdown rules for application components and business logic using a visual user interface. No programming is required as complex rules can be communicated visually and modified in a UI with no need to understand the scripting language. As you can see, scripts are more complex than APMs.

The following breakdown helps emphasize the main differences in usability, maintainability, scalability and failover, and costs.

APM-Infographic.jpg

Learn more about NXTmonitor the most flexible APM on the market.

One thought on “Managing Application Components: Using Scripts versus Application Performance Management (APM) Tools

  1. Kevin Barnes June 28, 2016 / 2:46 pm

    This APM would be excellent as a tool for DevOps teams. The configuration could be imported by operations and they would have a working infrastructure.

    Like

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